How a Pleasant Shopping Experience Can Make Your Day

Would anyone in this world be jubilant about spending at least 2.5 hours in a grocery store? Well, I can honestly say, “I would not.” However, my shopping experience today was a very satisfying.

To begin, to put this experience into context, let me describe for you our new, enormous marketplace grocery store that recently opened in our neighborhood. This store has almost everything that one might desire. First and foremost, for me, there is a coffee shop, not to mention a wine bar, where you can stop and have a drink of wine and socialize before or after your shopping experience. Once you have tackled your grocery list, if there is just a little left over in your budget, you can treat yourself to a piece of clothing or a pair of shoes.

Now that I have set the tone of my experience, let me move on to the gist of my article, why in the world did this shopping experience last 2.5 hours. Well, to begin, I had just returned from an early morning medical appointment and I had not had my morning cup of java and anyone that knows me, can understand why that would be a problem. So, my first stop was the coffee shop. Once, I had my first sip, I was good to go. However, my stomach alerted me that the shopping experience would not be good, if my hunger was not satisfied. Just in the nick of time, while at the food deli, I was greeted by one of the store employees and I questioned her about breakfast foods. She immediately pointed me into the direction of a rack where there was one large Meat Lover’s Burrito left. Without hesitation, I grabbed the burrito, returned to the coffee area to eat it.

Now that my hunger had been satisfied, I moved on to the vegetable and fruit area. While picking out my vegetables, there was another shopper who had on nautical clothing. So, I kindly mentioned to her that her attire would be the perfect outfit for me, as I am planning to go on a cruise in a few weeks. She responded and we socialized for just a little bit. I noticed that she was removing her earrings and without hesitation, she gave them to me and went on to explain her reasoning. She thought they would go very well with my cruising experience, as the theme was, of course, nautical. I stated that I could not accept her earrings; however, she insisted because she indicated she had another pair exactly like this pair. Remembering what my mother taught me, “to always be humble and graciously, thankful for any gift that I receive.” So, I thanked her for the gift and mentioned that I would tuck them away in a safe place until my trip.

Moving on, my next area would be the gourmet cheese section and there I met another shopper where her and I discussed the various cheeses that was displayed in the counter. She, pleasantly, began to share with me her experience with cheese and she sounded like a “cheese expert” to me. I should have mentioned early in the article that my family deemed a “social butterfly” early in life and I have lived up to that reputation since then. So, our conversation continued for well over 15 minutes, of course, drifting off to several other topics. After a while, we shared what area of the community that we lived in and would you believe that she turned out to be my neighbor, whom I had met approximately four years ago. We both moved into the community around the same time. Subsequently, we shared our contact information, once again, and both of us decided that we needed to get back to shopping and agreed to stay in touch.

Finally, my grocery shopping was all done and I proceeded on to the check-out counter. In conclusion, my hope is that by sharing my experience, it will challenge others to take the time to reach out to others. Extend a friendly compliment to someone, or pay it forward; and, hopefully, the positive experience will help set a tone for the rest of your day, as well as the other individual with whom you interacted.

Picnics & Pointers

Picnics have been around for as long as people have been eating meals (even if they didn’t realize it at the time). Over the years, the “dictionary definition” of picnic has changed; however, the original relaxed setting associated with a picnic still resonates today. The mention of a “picnic” versus a “cookout” or “BBQ” tends to take one down a slower, nostalgic path. Taking food out of the kitchen and moving to a less formal setting has been enjoyed throughout the ages.

Whether in a park, at a festival, on a hike in the woods, or in your own living room, having an informal meal in a setting other than your normal meal setting will put one in a frame of mind that alters significantly from what is commonly referred to as breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Formality is no longer at the forefront of the meal. The lack of formality tends to lead to more open, fun communication with those you choose to have at your picnic.

It’s best to keep the food simple. One should not over-complicate a picnic meal. Keeping the items simple and light will lend to the change being incurred with the change of scenery. Items such as finger sandwiches, crackers and cheese, meat and cheese wraps, fruits, nuts and/or vegetables are all simple foods that provide sustenance and variety when planning a picnic.

The foods and location you choose will dictate whether or not you require to keep the food cold or if it requires heating once you arrive. There are cool packs, small grills and solar warmers that can be used almost anywhere these days. Be sure to keep your food stuffs at the appropriate temperatures to prevent food born illnesses.

Whenever there’s a meal, drinks should definitely a consideration. Water, wine, soda, coffee and tea are all popular. Small coolers of ice and reusable cups are always a good idea. Should you decide on wine, be sure to pack a corkscrew or you’ll be very sorry come mealtime.

Your location will dictate some of the supplies you will need to have available and carry with you on your route. If you’re in your living room with the furniture pushed back to create a space, the weather is likely not going to have an impact on your event. However, if you choose an outdoor setting, weather is a definite consideration – from what to wear to what you might bring with you. Umbrellas are great for beaches and unpredictable weather while backpacks and outdoor gear are more suitable for true outdoor enthusiasts that may be hiking to their final destination.

As you are considering what to eat and drink and where to have your picnic, there are other items highly recommended to have on-hand. Other items that come in handy when picnicking are:

  • Plates & Utensils
  • Napkins and/or Paper Towels
  • Salt & pepper
  • Blanket (in the event there are no picnic tables where you end up)
  • Sanitizing Wipes
  • Garbage Bag(s)

If you’ve never been on a picnic or it’s simply been a long time since your last one, please make a plan and take a moment to relax and enjoy the smaller things in life; starting with a picnic.

Pile on the Pasta

Those Chinese did it again. While we think of pasta as a culturally Italian food, it likely originates from ancient Asian noodles. No one knows for sure, but credit is often given to merchant and explorer Marco Polo as responsible for bringing pasta back to Italy during the 13th century. Noodles had been a staple in China for over 2000 years. They likely were made with rice, but once Italians embraced the noodles, they began to use plentiful wheat flour to produce their famous spaghetti.

However, historical references may indeed dispute pasta’s Asian origin, as various pasta-type foods are mentioned in earlier centuries. Enter the Greeks, who originally occupied Naples, a southern region of Italy and are thought to have introduced a pasta- like food to the Neapolitans. Since Italy’s major grain producers and processors were in the south, it’s highly likely that long, thin pasta made its way north to Rome and other cities. Long before Marco Polo, first century Roman poet Horace described thin sheets of dough called lagana and served fried as an everyday food. Several centuries later, this dough was stuffed with meat and perhaps made way for present day lasagna.

By the sixteenth century, the dried version made storage easy, and who knows, perhaps Columbus carried the food on his voyage to discover America, as did many ships who made expeditions into parts unknown. The availability of pasta and its versatility made it a hit throughout Europe, and cooks found it easy to create new dishes. Originally eaten by hand, once sauces were introduced as an accompaniment, utensils took a prominent place on dining tables.

So when did the U.S. get its first taste of pasta? While it originally adorned the tables of the wealthy, in the late 1800’s our modern version of spaghetti caught on, first in the restaurants of Italian immigrants, then across the nation as a filling and economical meal for families. While some cooks did not serve it with tomato sauce, the different forms of pasta could be added to soups or mixed with vegetables.

Believe it or not, Thomas Jefferson is said to have brought back a pasta machine from his European travels, and his daughter, who was the lady of the house, served pasta dishes with Parmesan cheese. (Imagine her horror to learn that mass-produced boxes of mac and cheese would eventually populate grocery store shelves.) Later on, other fans substituted Cheddar, and it became a crowd pleaser and favorite of the American diet. What would childhood be without mac and cheese?

In the mid-twentieth century, packaged dry pastas, canned pasta products and sauces began to adorn the shelves of supermarkets, and pasta became a staple of American life. Chef Boyardee introduced children to pasta and turned off adults to his mushy ravioli and Spaghettios.

Pasta lives on in all its glory, its unending possibilities and its delicious varieties. So while the historians continue to debate, whoever created its humble beginnings, we are thankful. Pile on the pasta, any way you like.

Vinegar – The Acid We Love

Vinegar has been in use for thousands of years and traces its heritage to China, as do many other condiments and staples of the modern diet. Going back to 2000 B.C. vinegar was disdained as a beverage due to its harsh acidic taste, but was soon incorporated into a myriad of foods and other uses, taking its place on the ships of the spice traders.

But perhaps getting a jump on the Chinese were the Babylonians, as recordings start about 5000 BC, when the Babylonians were using fruits to make wine and vinegar, most likely the date palm. (Let’s face it, apples were pretty scarce in Egypt.) Residues have been found in ancient Egyptian urns as far back as 3000 B.C. and, like the Chinese, it was a popular pickling agent. Centuries later, Cleopatra used vinegar daily for her many personal beauty treatments.

The Bible frequently refers to vinegar being used for bathing and embalming, and it was offered to Jesus Christ when he was crucified on the cross. In the Islam traditions, it is thought to have been a favorite of the Prophet Mohammed. Of course the European royalty were not to be left out, using it primarily in food preparation. (They weren’t big on bathing.)

Hippocrates, the father of medicine, prescribed apple cider vinegar to be mixed with honey for a variety of health complaints, including lung congestion and coughs. He theorized that vinegar could remove infection by applying it to the wounded area,which was vital for the armies of ancient Greece.

In 218 B.C. the Carthaginian general Hannibal pressed vinegar into service when he crossed the Alps. His troops discovered that heating vinegar then pouring it over large stones would dissolve them, making passage easier for their animals.

The army of King Louis XIII of France, in the early 1600’s, used vinegar to cool off the cannons of his army in their many battles. When applied to the hot iron cannons, it not only had a cooling effect, but cleaned the surface metal, thus inhibiting rust.

Not to be outdone, many armies of the Middle Ages, when some country was always waging war, found that vinegar mixed with sand formed an abrasive material that was great for cleaning armor. (The forerunner of SOS pads?)

European alchemists in the Middle Ages poured it over lead, which created a sweet tasting substance they called “sugar of lead.” It was used into the nineteenth century to sweeten bitter ciders. As we now know, lead is highly poisonous, which resulted in the early death of many cider aficionados. They also learned the hard way not to store lead in metal containers.

In 1721, once again the Bubonic Plague reared its deadly head in many French cities. The French used imprisoned convicts to bury the dead, and the tale goes that four convicted thieves survived exposure to the infected bodies by drinking large amounts of vinegar daily, infused with garlic. Today, Four Thieve’s Vinegar is still sold in parts of France.

Not merely content to invent the pasteurization process for milk, scientist Louis Pasteur also experimented with a natural fermentation process to make vinegar, around the year 1864. It became popular for pickling vegetables and fruits, as well as a meat tenderizer. Vinegar promptly found its way into the first recipe for ketchup by the Henry J. Heinz Company and forever changed the popular condiment.

Imagine a kitchen without at least one bottle of vinegar, but more likely several varieties, including apple cider, red wine and balsamic. As many flavored vinegars continue to flourish, its popularity extends to thousands of other uses, including cleaning agents, pickling, salad dressings and a myriad of others. Regardless of who created it, Vinegar is clearly a staple of the world.

Everyone Say Cheese!

Truly one of life’s great pleasures, who doesn’t like cheese. Stack it on your burger, add it to a sandwich,eat it plain, mix it in casseroles and that all-time favorite, mac and cheese, there is a type for every taste bud, age and budget. Dating back thousands of years B.C. cheese was first created by populations who herded milk-producing animals. The art of cheese making was refined over the centuries until it became a staple of Western Europeans, from the poor to the royals and everyone in between. Whether you’re an aficionado of fine gourmet cheeses, or an unapologetic fan of Velveeta, there’s nothing quite like it. Pity the lactose intolerant who have to pass on cheese..

Well, this time the Chinese were out of the loop. Cheese clearly was created in areas of Europe which are now Poland and its environs, possibly as far back as 7000 B.C. In all fairness, the Chinese did not use dairy and presumably didn’t herd milk-producing animals, so they had no hand in creating cheese or milk products at all.

Ancient herders discovered that milk solids could be turned into a cheese-like substance, and since cheese lasted far longer than milk, which easily spoiled, it was a popular food for travelers and shepherds. But early cheeses were undoubtedly bland, liquidy and probably resembled our present day cottage cheese. As cheese making processes were refined and different varieties created, this wonderful food took on a whole new persona. Greeks embraced cheese, which they made with sheep and goat’s milk, and their cheese tended to be crumbly, similar to present-day feta. Adding a few herbs to the milk mixture gave it flavor, and cheese traveled well, providing a good source of protein for their ancient armies.

Soon royalty had their chefs pursue the art of cheese making, and it spread through Western Europe, quickly embraced by the Roman Empire. Monks joined in, understanding that along with their staples of bread and wine, cheese provided a substantial meal in the monasteries. Once it reached France, a country synonymous with the word “cheese”, the French took it to a whole new level, enjoying the creamy textures and creating cuisine around the various varieties they produced (think Camembert, Brie and Roquefort). Today, every region of France boasts their own particular cheese.

And speaking of Roquefort, how many of us get confused by the different varieties and the interchangeable term “blue cheese?” Let’s clear this up. Blue cheese is basically a generic term. There are three major types: Roquefort (French), Gorgonzola (Italian) and Stilton (British). The U.S. was kind of left out with this variety, (but don’t tell that to people in Wisconsin). Roquefort and Gorgonzola are two variations of blue cheese. Roquefort is French, made from sheep’s milk, and Gorgonzola is Italian, made from cow’s milk. Roquefort has a sharpness, but not as strong and robust as Gorgonzola. And then there is Stilton. A popular British version, but considered to be a poor cousin in the eyes of cheese connoisseurs.

Originating in the village of Somerset, England, cheddar cheese is a hard, off-white, sharp-tasting natural cheese. (The orange color is added.) It is probably the most popular type in the U.S. and is what the so-called American cheese (which isn’t really cheese at all) is modeled after. Europeans enjoy cheddar in its natural white color and frequently end a meal with a plate of room temperature cheeses and fruits. Most foodies eschew American cheese, which adorns our fast food cheeseburgers and our beloved mac and cheese. And then there’s Velveeta, considered the bottom of the barrel (but great for cooking).

Not to be slighted, Switzerland caught up with France and created their own wonderful versions. Their most popular are Gruyere and Emmental, which is called Swiss cheese in the U.S.

With the popularity of wine these days, what better accompaniment than cheese? Whether you favor a sharp cheddar, a smooth Gouda, a tangy Swiss or a creamy Brie, there’s just no getting around it: say cheese!

Say Hello to the Superfood, Yuca

Welcome to Yuca

Currently there is a global health movement growing. People are more conscious about their health and are seeking alternatives to traditional eating habits. The realization that there are many different superfoods virtually untouched by the average population has created a desire to experiment with and try new exotic foods. Many of these superfoods have been brought over from South America, Asia, and Africa. Indigenous peoples have thrived off the land and sustained massive civilizations with the use of superfoods. One in particular is gaining momentum in North America.

To the right, is the Yuca (Quechua name spoken in Peru) root. This root has many different names depending on where you are geographically: cassava, manioc, manioca, yucca root, casaba, and tapioca. It is currently an essential root vegetable in the Caribbean diet.

Yuca is a perennial plant that is found in tropical climates. In Africa, Asia, and South America, it has been used as a major food source. Indigenous people use it along with other high-starch foods like yams, taro, plantains, and potatoes. While it is still not well known outside of the tropics, it accounts for about 30% of the world production of roots. Recently popular in the Americas is tapioca. Grinding the yuca root into small powder balls forms tapioca balls- enjoyed in boba teas and various drinks.

To clarify some dispute, YUCA and YUCCA are two very different plants. Yuca, is the root while Yucca is a scrub.

Why the sudden interest?

As the world continues to connect more and more, people are able to enjoy the benefits of fruits and vegetables that were once out of reach. Not long ago, if you were not born in the tropics, yuca would have been virtually intangible. But now, people all over the world can reap the benefits.

The general population also has access to endless amounts of new information. So with that comes new opportunities to incorporate in daily life. Previously you would have walked into a grocery store, unable to decipher what this long brown root was. Now with a quick Google search the information is there for you disposal. Recipes for this root are endless. The endless recipes allow you to experiment and diversify your diet.

The Energy it Provides is Incredible!

In Peru, South America we visited a local family. They were simply the most welcoming, humble, and hardworking family I’d ever encountered. In many cultures around the world it is very common for large families to live together. In one home you may have your mother, father, grandparents, great-grandparents, children and grandchildren. It is very common to take in family members and live as one large family unit. What we saw in this family was that everyone was extraordinarily hard working. Even the great-grandparents would pitch in to help around the house. While the activity they partook in was more limited than those of the younger generations, it was incredible to see the how agile and energized these men and women were.

I remember asking one day how they found the energy to work so hard at their age.

With a smile the older lady said, “comer bien.”

That was it, a simple explanation. “Comer bien” translates to “eat well.” These families eat fresh and powerful superfoods everyday. The yuca root is only a supplement to the other superfoods Peruvians have been enjoying for centuries.

How is it that this simple answer: comer bien, could lead to a long-lasting and healthy life.

I thought back to the United States where much of our older generation are forced to reside in Nursing Homes, or never make it to be a great-grandparent. These older generations thrive in Peru and are well respected. Their persistent activity and nutritious diets help them excel in life.

Processed vs Natural

Now comes the inevitable truth that many populations that suffer with obesity hate to admit. You are what you eat. Now what we see with the people in Peru is that most families eat a diet consisting of fresh grains, fruits, and vegetables acquired at the local open-air markets. These families are fueling their bodies with unprocessed, natural ingredients. A meal is made from scratch and all meals are viewed as family events. Everyone eats meals together and eats equally. There is little overindulgence because the quality of food creates a sensation of satisfaction and wholeness. There is no need for a cookie after dinner because there is no dependency on sugar like we find in the U.S. Since the foods are unprocessed, meals lack added sugars and preservatives. Their bodies run like a well-oiled machine- not like one that is driven by cravings. Imagine how powerful your body would feel if you energized it with whole foods- superfoods! Could you imagine how strong you would feel. Not lacking energy, not craving chips or cream puffs. Incorporating superfoods such as yuca into your diet slowly can show you how strong you can feel. It takes one small step that will lead to endless amounts of healthy decisions.

Don’t be afraid to try yuca. Your body will thank you for it!

A Nutritional War Between Roasted And Raw Nuts – Which One Is Better?

Nuts are very healthy and have many essential minerals and nutrients that benefit your body. Many people eat them raw whereas, many people love to eat them roasted or cooked. You can eat them as a snack because it is ready to eat item. The best part is you can also use it to make various recipes such as Desserts, Biscuits, and Cakes etc. It is the fact that both raw and roasted nut have their own way to benefits the body, but it is the fact that roasted nut tends to be healthier than the raw one. Here is a difference between roasted vs. raw nuts that will help you to understand that which type is better for health.

  • The Nutrients Value – Roasted nuts are usually being roasted in little oil and contain salt that can increase value of the sodium intake. It is the fact that roasted nuts are rich in calories as compared to raw nuts, so if you are looking for a weight gain then, roasted nuts can be your best choice.
  • Taste Factor – Both types of nuts have their own different taste, but usually people like roasted nuts because it contains flavors. Raw nuts are simplistic in taste and sometimes a person gets bored by eating them. You can eat both of them as a snack as they both have their own unique taste and nutrition value.
  • Bacteria – Raw nuts have the higher chances of bacterial attack whereas, bacteria cannot affect the roasted nuts easily. It is the fact that a huge amount or harmful bacteria get eliminate after the roasting process. The number of contaminates also get removed after the cleaning process of the nuts that makes them safe for our health.
  • Chemical Process – Many manufacturers use the chemical method to roast the nuts, so it is very important to buy it from a trustworthy manufacturer to get the good quality product. Chemical harms the nutrition of the nuts and makes them tasteless because of which many people opt for raw nuts rather than the roasted one.

These are some differences between raw and roasted nuts. Both are good for health,so you can choose according to your taste and preferences. It is very important to buy the nuts from a good supplier to get fresh and premium products. Both roasted and raw nut are healthy in nature and they are available at a very affordable price, so one can easily buy them. Make sure to buy from a good manufacturer as a good one will always deliver you the fresh and pure products.

Some Facts About Pike Cavair As a Source of Health

In this article, we will talk about the benefits of pike caviar and its effect on health. Pike caviar is a product that is rich in protein, vitamins and has a lot of useful properties. This product can be useful to athletes, to people who are experiencing high physical and mental stress.

Speaking about the price, it is interesting that in the old days pike caviar was expensive, only the rich could buy it, so it was considered a royal delicacy. You can buy caviar in a jar, already cooked. But it is easy to prepare it at home.

To prepare it at home, this product from a chilled or fresh pike you need to clean from unnecessary films, put in a colander, rinse with boiling water. You need to add salt and mix. Put in a jar and cover with a layer of vegetable oil. Then you must store the caviar in the cold. This product is useful for those who have lowered hemoglobin. From it you can make excellent sandwiches and snacks.

This caviar is the pike’s eggs that have high biological value. Its taste and nutritional qualities make it possible to refer it to a better kind of caviar. The value of this caviar is the same as red and black, thanks to its useful properties and taste. It has a balanced composition, so it is used to solve many health problems. It contains protein, vitamin A, E, B 9, fatty acids, amino acids and macro-elements easily digestible by the human body: potassium, phosphorus, calcium and iodine. The use of pike caviar positively affects the condition of the skin, thanks to the presence of protein in it. This product is also effective in reducing immunity, which helps to avoid catarrhal diseases. Thanks to regular consumption of pike caviar, it is possible to normalize blood pressure and increase the hemoglobin content in the blood. It is the source of iodine, which helps keep the thyroid healthy.

Vitamin D, contained in this product, takes part in the development of bones. To prevent rickets, it is recommended that this product has to be eaten by children from the age of three. Such caviar is used to reduce the level of “bad” cholesterol and in the presence of cardiovascular diseases. Eating pike caviar, which is rich in iron, improves blood composition and strengthens the body with reduced hemoglobin. Fluoride, which is part of this product, has a strengthening effect on the enamel of the teeth and prevents the appearance of dental diseases. Pike caviar is also an additional source of minerals such as copper, chromium, calcium. Specialists recommend it to people who have high mental and physical stress, as well as those who are in the stage of recovery from severe operations, diseases and injuries. It is known that eating it, you can increase visual acuity. This product is an effective remedy for protecting the nervous system and relieving the effects of stress. Using it, you can restore sexual dysfunction, since it is an aphrodisiac.

This product can’t be used by children under three years of age and by people who have an individual intolerance. At an early age, it can cause allergies. Do not forget that caviar can be substandard, so the choice of pike caviar should be approached carefully. Caviar can be harmful to pregnant women, as it contributes to the retention of excess fluid in the body. Contraindication for the consumption of it may be an exacerbation of any chronic disease. Eating large amounts of this product can cause hypertension.

Please Pass the Mustard

Who doesn’t love mustard, be it yellow or brown, on a hot dog, a sandwich, or even blended into a casserole, salad dressing or appetizer. We love our condiments, and, second only to ketchup, no one loves mustard more than Americans. It’s practically a national institution (alongside the hot dog). During the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, a small company named French’s introduced their yellow mustard on hotdogs, and the popularity exploded.

There are more than 40 species of mustard plants, with their seeds each offering a slightly different flavor and color to create many varieties of mustards. Add other flavorful ingredients, like cranberries, horseradish, hot peppers or honey, and the condiment aficionado could have a veritable cupboard full of delightful mustards to try.

In the Bible, the mustard seed is used in the book of Matthew as a parable, where Jesus teaches that one need only have the faith of a (lowly) mustard seed to move mountains. For Christians, it has been a symbol of faith since the New Testament.

The actual condiment, in some form, dates back to the early Romans, when it was ground from seeds and mixed with juice into a paste, similar to the prepared mustards we use today. The name is derived from “mustum” (from the Latin meaning “burning must” which was the practice of using the juice of young grapes to form a paste). Mustard as a spice was popular in Europe long before the ancient Asian spice trade, and grape-loving Romans planted it in their vineyards alongside the grapevines. The country of France embraced it when many brothers in French monasteries cultivated, prepared and sold mustard as early as the ninth century and can be traced back to shops in Paris in the 13th century.

Two enterprising Frenchmen by the names of Maurice Grey and Antoine Poupon created one of the most popular mustards in the world, Grey Poupon Dijon, in the 1770’s. They discovered that by adding white wine to their private recipe, a totally different and pleasant flavor emerged. Their original store still exists in the town of Dijon. Who can forget the classic TV commercial where two limousines pull up next to each other, and a very proper and obviously wealthy passenger calls out the window inquiring if the other limo has any Grey Poupon on board.

Across the pond, in 1866, a Brit named Jeremiah Colman, founder of the recognizable brand of Colman’s Mustard of England, was appointed as the official mustard maker to Queen Victoria. Colman pioneered the same grinding technique used today, which pulverizes seeds into a fine powder in a way that protects the escape of the flavorful oils. In many British pubs, a crock of spicy mustard can be seen on each table, which, when placing a small amount on one’s tongue, is purported to create a thirst prior to ordering one’s favorite ale or beer.

Even Pope John XII was such a fan of mustard that, like Queen Victoria, he appointed a young man as the Grand Mustard Maker to the Pope. It just happened to be the Pope’s nephew, who was a resident of the Dijon region in France.

Like so many other words in the English language, mustard has other unrelated meanings, such as “cutting the mustard” or “mustard gas,” a lethal weapon during WWI and WWII. In Ireland, referring to someone as “mustard” can mean ill-tempered.

Regardless of your preferences (make mine Grey Poupon, please) there are hundreds of mustards to choose from. If you just can’t get enough, you can visit the National Mustard Museum in Middleton, Wisconsin, where more than 5,500 mustards are on display, and you can sample many of them at the tasting bar. And of course there are hundreds of beloved mustards on sale, so you won’t leave empty-handed.

Store Your Nuts The Right Way To Keep Them Fresh And Tasty

Nuts like Almonds, Cashew, Walnuts are very much good of our health, as they are loaded with a number of Vitamins, Minerals, Proteins, and other nutrients your body requires. Choosing the best of its quality is important to reap their real benefits for your good health and not only buying, but preserving them for a longer period is also important. Storing them is the main concern most of the people face and if you also don’t know how to preserve it the right way, so, here we are with some of our tips. Take a look and store your nuts the right way without affecting their freshness and taste.

  • Keep It In Cool And Dry Condition: One of the important things you need to keep in mind to store the nuts right way is, always keep them in cool and dry conditions. They get damaged when easily get in touch with the moisture, so, always keep them in an air-tight container in cool and dry conditions to ensure their long shelf life and preserve their taste.
  • Never Leave Them Open: If you leave your nuts open, so, they easily absorb the odor of the material around them and get damaged in most of the conditions, therefore, it is important to store them in air-tight containers.
  • Keep Them In Freezer: Whether you accept it or not, but is a true fact that nuts, especially almonds if stored in the freezer or refrigerator, so they can remain as it is up to a year. Freezing won’t let them lose their taste and keep them fresh for a longer period.
  • Keep Them Away From Humid Conditions: Humidity is the true killer of nuts; they affect not only their life but taste as well. Therefore, you shouldn’t keep them in a humid atmosphere to preserve their freshness and delightful taste.
  • Seal The Bag: If you buy roasted nuts, so, you have to keep them away from coming in contact with the oxygen, therefore, it is advisable to keep them in vacuum bags or seal them properly to secure their shelf life.

These are some of the easy and common tips that help you store nuts in a better way that too for a longer period. So, the next time, don’t panic if you buy nuts in bulk quantity, as now you know the right way to store them correctly. You can even ask the dry fruits manufacturers from where you buy the nuts; they may surely provide such suggestion to you.